SHELBY CITY CEMETERY VOLUNTEERS RECEIVE PRESIDENT’S VOLUNTEER SERVICE AWARD

SHELBY CITY CEMETERY VOLUNTEERS RECEIVE PRESIDENT’S VOLUNTEER SERVICE AWARD

 

Several members of the work crew of the Shelby City African American Cemetery were honored on May 5, 2016, at Eastern Kentucky University with a national President’s Volunteer Service Award at the Gold level. This group award is given to teams of volunteers who have devoted 1,000 hours or more to a community project within the last year.

The President’s Volunteer Service Award recognizes individuals and groups that have achieved a certain standard – measured by the number of hours of service during a 12-month period or cumulative hours earned over the course of a lifetime. According to the PVSA website, “Recognizing and honoring volunteers sets a standard for service, encourages a sustained commitment to civic participation, and inspires others to make service a central part of their lives.”

Since October 2014, the members of the Shelby City Cemetery Project have devoted over 3,000 hours of service to restoring the abandoned slave cemetery, but this award is recognition for their work in the last year. In addition to the group award, Amanda Iocono received a Bronze level award in the Young Adult category for her service, and 8-year-old Ray Spears received a Bronze level award in the Kids category. Two of the winners, Mike Denis and Bob Coppings, are instructors at the EKU Danville Campus.

From left to right, Mike Denis, Bob Coppings, Amanda Iocono, Cindy Peck, Ray Spears, Charles Grey, and Barry Sanborn. An eighth volunteer, Ralph Godbey could not be present for the photo.

Published on May 10, 2016

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